Catch Phrases That Kill Deals

Want to Increase Your Level of Influence in All Areas of Your Life? Watch this video and avoid common catch phrases that will demotivate people from acting on your ideas. Please leave comments on the phrases you hear that just irritate you.

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0 thoughts on “Catch Phrases That Kill Deals”

  1. wonderful tip Ron.

    I am finding that Executives are tuning salespeople out during prospecting calls and presentations for using words that are overused. It makes us like everyone else, the goal is to set yourself apart. right?

    Instead of using words like Awesome, fantastic, great, try replacing these words with fine, good, wonderful, attractive.

  2. Hey, Ron! You know who else you should never use these phrases with…your lender! I train lenders on tax return analysis and we cover the signs that someone might not be totally honest with you, the lender.

    Your ‘death’ phrases are at the top of my list!
    Linda

  3. Great reminder, Ron. ‘Love the video; it’s just the right length too.

    I’m pretty aware when the salesperson says, “Let me be honest with you,” it implies she /he hasn’t been honest before. However, you reminded me that when the salesperson says, “Now be honest with me,” it implies that the prospect has been lying, and that’s a whole ‘nother ballgame.

    Michelle Nichols
    Former BusinessWeek sales columnist
    Founder, Global Hug Your Kids Day – July 18, 2011

  4. Ron- from one Communications Coach to another, YOU nailed it! The fault lies in “one size fits allllll”. Catch All phrases are not specific and indicate thoughtlessness and lazyness. It communicates “you’re not really worth my time to custom tailor my response to you.” As you know, I’ve written a weekly column in The NY Post on Professionalism because there is sooooo little of it any more. An Ivy League college Dean revealed: “I get emails all day long addressed: ‘YO DEAN’!!!” The LOL world should NOT be transported to a pitch, or any PROFESSIONAL exchange. Ron, keep sharing your insights.

  5. Ron –

    Gr8 advice – and those phrases are a pet peeve of mine as well…Thanks Ron for your insight and direction. And from one New Yorker to another…I Love The Accent! Don’t Lose It – It is part of your BRAND!

  6. Great post, Ron. In my nearly ten years (I know, still a kid) of sales and sales leadership, I have always enjoyed coaching someone away from phrases like:
    • “Let me talk to my manager…”
    • Overusing the words “trust me” to emphasis a point
    • So, what’s your budget (without first doing a needs analysis or learning more about the buying motivations)
    • Do you want to use my pen or yours?

    I’ve heard so many “good” ones like this – some I even use as jokes in role-play scenarios. In fact, some of them have been used by salespersons in situations where I was the consumer.

  7. In my nearly ten years (I know, still a kid) of sales and sales leadership, I have always enjoyed coaching someone away from phrases like:
    • “Let me talk to my manager…”
    • Overusing the words “trust me” to emphasis a point
    • So, what’s your budget (without first doing a needs analysis or learning more about the buying motivations)
    • Do you want to use my pen or yours?

    I’ve heard so many “good” ones like this – some I even use as jokes in role-play scenarios. In fact, some of them have been used by salespersons in situations where I was the consumer. We have to coach our folks to be more engaged in the customer than this!

    Great post and great topic, Ron.

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